Sunday, October 7, 2012

Fall bulbs in bloom

There's lots of fall flowers in my garden right now, but fall bulbs in bloom are a special treat.

My little patch of fall crocus (Sternbergia lutea) is blooming splendidly.
fall crocus

Earlier in the month, my three-year-old patch of oxblood lilies (Rhodophiala bifida) bloomed for the first time.
oxblood lilies

And with the rain a couple of weeks ago, I enjoyed a handful of rain lily blooms (Zephyranthes).
pink rainlily

I don't have many rain lilies, but they're forming nice plump seed pods, so I'm hoping to have more of them soon!
rain lily seed pods

What blooming bulbs herald fall's arrival in your garden?

Words and photos © 2009-2012 Caroline Homer for "The Shovel-Ready Garden". Unauthorized reproduction is prohibited.

9 comments:

  1. You plant all the cool bulbs. Those red tulips you blogged about in the spring are still on my radar. I guess I better get a move on if I want to add them to the garden.

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    1. Girl, you best 'get to gettin'. Old House Gardens is the only supplier for T. clusiana I trust. I've planted others and they just aren't the same. http://www.oldhousegardens.com/display.aspx?prod=TU25

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  2. Don't you love the bulbs?!?! Always a treat!

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  3. Next garden, I'll have to figure out some bulb plantings, and maybe rain lilies. For now, my very new oxblood lilies are all up and green, after many soakings w/ the hose. Same with Mexican Blue Sage...watered in, now coming back. I would say your rain and milder weather is paying off in a huge way...hoping for the same here, too. (any rain, that is)

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    1. I think you're absolutely right - the rain and less-than-blistering summer has really helped this year's fall bloom spurt.

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  4. Oh, Caroline, those Crocus are so cool ~ I had no idea there was an autumn-blooming variety! I don't have any fall-blooming bulbs here at the new house...maybe next year! All yours are lovely!
    Hugs,
    Anne

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    1. Sternbergia lutea can really take the heat and drought, too! There are several fall crocuses, including C. sativus, the saffron crocus (which I planted as well, but sadly they did not return). Also check out the crocus-like Colchicums (poisonous, definitely not culinary!). Look around and I'm sure you can find some that grow in your hardiness zone.

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  5. I like the yellow crocus - but because they're poisonous to cats I'm trying to avoid them until I don't have cats. stupid cats and their eating everything that's poisonous for them.

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